48 Hours In Prague

May 31, 2016 Czech Republic Write a Comment 2,211 Views

48 Hours In Prague.

We live in the heart of Europe. Austria is surrounded by eight countries: Hungary, Slovakia, Slovenia, Italy, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Germany and the Czech Republic. This makes a short weekend trip to either one oft them nothing out of the ordinary. Just recently, we had the opportunity to travel to Prague, one of Europe’s most beautiful cities, once again.

On A Roadtrip To Prague.

Along with the best mum in the world, a bag of yummy picknick goodies and the cute Opel Karl, we were one our way up north.

A few stops in between and just about five hours later, we arrived at the IBIS Praha Old Town Hotel, right in the centre of the city. I can really suggest a hotel near the Old Town, because from here, you’ll reach almost anything by foot.

Prague’s Treasure Chamber, Day 1:

48 hours doesn’t sound like lot of time for a capital city with as many sights as Prague. But if the timing is right and you’re not a lazy bum, then you’ll be able to explore all the famous landmarks of the city.

Prague’s centre is a cultural treasure chamber! Indispensable is the Old Town Square of the city with the gothic Church of Our Lady before Týn and the oldest still operating Astronomical Clock in the world, which is located on the facade of the old Town Hall.

  • A short side note: My great great great grandfather Anton Michalitschke was one of the people repairing the astronomical clock between 1787 bis 1791.

Continue walking East and you’ll reach the 621 metre long and nearly 10 metre wide Charles Bridge, which is also one the most frequented sights of the city. Still, there is no way around (or better across) it. And after all, it is a nice stroll through the bridge tower, across the Vltava river that leads the way up to the largest ancient castle in the world: Prague Castle. Just a small place, where two catholic town councils and a secretary were thrown out of a window in 1618, that then started a war that would last 30 years and seized almost all of Europe. We could have spent hours here, but set our focus to the Golden Lane and Saint Vitus Cathedral, which was enough for the day. Close to 20 kilometres of walking made our feet sorer than sore!

Prague’s Treasure Chamber, Day 2:

Our sightseeing tour started again at the old town spare, from were it only took us a couple of minutes until we reached the Old Jewish Cemetery in the district Josefov. It’s the largest Jewish cemetery in Europe and stands out due to it’s many wildly arranged tombstones.

We quickly realised that our legs still hurt and decided it give our feet some rest and went on a two hour boat cruise. It lead all the way from Cech Bridge to Vysehrad fort. The Dancing House was just one of the sights we got to see during our cruise.

It’s not for nothing that up to 50.000 people visit Prague each day during the high season. Prague is one of the most spectacular cities in Europe that is often underrated and only narrowed down to just a few beautiful sights. So at this point, we’d like to thank Opel and Accor for sponsoring this trip – it was a real pleasure!

The second day passed a lot faster and we now either had the choice to spend a few hours more in Prague, or to drive West to a place called Sedlec Ossuary (aka Skull Church) before returning to Vienna. Who wouldn’t want to see 70.000 skeletons in one of the most macabre buildings you could find? Yup, that’s us alright!

  • Sightseeing Tip: The view up from the top of the Old Town Hall is absolutely stunning!
  • Lunch Tip: Prague has so many lovely restaurants to chose from, no doubt about that. But Mistral Café & Restaurant is a sweet and homey place with food that is to die for!
  • Love Tip: Like in many other cities around the world, lover’s locks can be found near the John Lennon Wall in Prague.
The Old Town Square in Prague is home to some of the most iconic and dramatic buildings of the city.
The Old Town Square in Prague is home to some of the most iconic and dramatic buildings of the city.
The most notable sights on the square are the Old Town Hall Tower & Astronomical Clock, Tyn Church and St. Nicholas Church. At the centre (left in this photo) of the Old Town Square is the Jan Hus statue.
The most notable sights on the square are the Old Town Hall Tower & Astronomical Clock, Tyn Church and St. Nicholas Church. At the centre (left in this photo) of the Old Town Square is the Jan Hus statue.
Be sure to climb the Old Town Hall Tower in Prague for a stunning view over the square.
Be sure to climb the Old Town Hall Tower in Prague for a stunning view over the square.
To fully appreciate the Astronomical Clock, join the crowd in front of the tower to watch the procession of the Twelve Apostles: on the hour, every hour, a small trap door opens and Christ marches out ahead of his disciples, while the skeleton of death tolls the bell to a defiant statue of a Turk.
To fully appreciate the Astronomical Clock, join the crowd in front of the tower to watch the procession of the Twelve Apostles: on the hour, every hour, a small trap door opens and Christ marches out ahead of his disciples, while the skeleton of death tolls the bell to a defiant statue of a Turk.
The Dancing House (designed by architects Vlado Milunic and Frank Gehry) in Prague is set by the Vltava River. Its design is unique, and especially striking in the city centre because it is a modern building surrounded by historic architecture.
The Dancing House (designed by architects Vlado Milunic and Frank Gehry) in Prague is set by the Vltava River. Its design is unique, and especially striking in the city centre because it is a modern building surrounded by historic architecture.
The Old Jewish Cemetery is among the oldest surviving Jewish burial grounds in the world and along with the Old-New Synagogue, it's the most important site in the Jewish quarter of Prague.
The Old Jewish Cemetery is among the oldest surviving Jewish burial grounds in the world and along with the Old-New Synagogue, it’s the most important site in the Jewish quarter of Prague.
According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Prague Castle is the largest coherent castle complex in the world, with an area of almost 70,000 m². It's also a UNESCO World Heritage site.
According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Prague Castle is the largest coherent castle complex in the world, with an area of almost 70,000 m². It’s also a UNESCO World Heritage site.
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